CareNow® - October 24, 2017

Halloween is always one of the most anticipated holidays for children. Between dressing up in costumes and getting bags full of candy, there’s no better event than trick or treating. However, Halloween can also be a very dangerous holiday. Whether you will be accompanying your child this year or they are old enough to go trick or treating by themselves, there are ways you can help them stay safe. This Halloween, make sure you implement the following safety tips to ensure you and your family have a safe holiday.

 CareNow wishes you a safe halloween

Halloween Safety Tips For Children

Accompany your kiddos: Although your kids may protest, it’s a good idea to stay close by while they go trick or treating. An adult’s presence is enough to keep strangers away. Plus, it will ensure your children don’t get lost while out.

Create fun, yet safe, costumes: While many costumes include masks, face paint is typically a better option as masks can occasionally hinder your child’s eyesight. If possible, it’s also a great idea to include reflective tape on your child’s costume so they can be seen by traffic.

Inspect your child’s candy: No matter how old your child is, it’s always smart to take a peak at the candy they receive. Unfortunately, some people will place dangerous items, such as drugs, inside the candy. Make sure all candy is still in its original seal and has not been tampered with.

CareNow Safety Tips For Halloween

Decorate wisely: One of the most popular Halloween decorations is the jack-o’-lantern. While the glow of this decoration can add a spooky effect to your home, it is also important to keep them away from curtains and other decorations where they could potentially start a fire. It is also smart to keep your sidewalk clear of decorations that trick-or-treaters could potentially trip on. Use LED candles to light up your jack-o’-lanterns for a safer alternative.

Drive safely: While it’s important to keep an eye on your own children on Halloween, it’s also crucial to be mindful of other kids out trick or treating. If you have to leave the house, drive as slowly as possible and make sure your car lights are on so your presence can be known.

Bright up the night: Before going out, put give your child a glow stick and flashlight (both if you can). They are a great way to stand out in the dark to drivers and other trick-or-treaters. These items can also help your child see avoid tripping on steps or curbs because he or she will be able to see.

Halloween Safety Tips for Older Kids

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Agree on a route: Pick a route for your children and their friends to take that is well lit and heavily populated by other trick-or-treaters and their parents. Establishing a route is especially important if you won’t be accompanying your children. That way, if you need to find them, you’ll know where to look.

Send them off with a cellphone: Give your witch or superhero a cellphone for added freedom and security. Kids can call home to alert you when they spot an awesome haunted house down the street they want to visit, even though visiting it may require deviating from the agreed-upon route.’

Ask “What if? …”: Ask your children what they would do if someone older than them took their candy. Or what would they do if someone dared them to egg a house or smash someone’s pumpkins. By following this Halloween safety tip, you prepare your children for these kinds of potential encounters.

Emphasize “stranger danger” concerns: It’s Halloween, so telling your children not to take candy from strangers is a bit over the top, but an important Halloween safety tip is to direct your children to enter a stranger’s a home only if there’s an emergency. This includes neighbors’ homes, a friend’s older sibling’s home, or anywhere else your children trick-or-treat.

Wait until later to dig in: Tell your children to wait until they get home to eat candy they receive. Have them dump their loot out on the floor and sort through the candy together. If you find anything not in its original wrapper, throw it out.

Dress comfortably: Provide your children with comfortable shoes. Avoid high heels for girls, and double knot all shoelaces to avoid the likelihood your children will trip in the dark. Also make sure costumes aren’t so long that they drag on the ground. It’s also wise to avoid masks, since these can make it difficult for a child to see and breathe. Non-toxic face paint is a better way to complete the costume.

 

Halloween Safety Tips For Parents

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As a parent, there are a few things you can do to help ensure other’s children are safe on Halloween night. Because the streets around your home will be full of children and families walking around, it’s best to avoid getting into your car. Fewer people driving on the streets is better. You should also turn on any lights outside your house to keep your street better lit.

If you’re a health-conscious parent looking for better options to hand out to the neighborhood kids, consider individually packed bags of popcorn, gummy treats or even granola bars. Non-food items like rubber balls and stickers are also a great option.

Before your kids head out to trick or treat, it’s a good idea to feed them a healthy dinner, high in protein, to prevent them from filling up on just candy. If you’re going to be walking your child around to trick or treat, wearing comfortable shoes can make a big difference. Finally, carry a flashlight when walking with your child so you both can see once the sun goes down.

CareNow® Can Help If There's Any Minor Illness Or Injury

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If you experience any problems this Halloween that require medical attention, contact your local CareNow®. Most clinics are open until 8pm, and re-open at 8am the following day. If you experience any minor illness or injuries after this year's festivities, be sure to come see us.  

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Disclaimer: Patients’ health can vary. Always consult with a medical professional before taking medication, making health-related decisions or deciding if medical advice is right for you.